K 18 Pill: What It Is, Side-Effects & Risks Of Use, & How To Get Help If Struggling With An Addiction

the k 18 pill, better known just as oxycodone or oxy. 

Did you know that all medications have a unique shape and identifier? 

The color, shape, and number of letters printed on your medication are all used to help pharmacists verify that the medication they are dispensing is the correct medication as ordered by your physician. 

Because many of the medications sold on the black market are originally manufactured in pharmacies and hospitals, some of those same medication markers can be used to identify drugs that you find or purchase in places other than a pharmacy. 

Of course, it’s always best to only take drugs prescribed to you and dispensed by a pharmacy. It’s not safe, or in some cases, legal, to take a medication that hasn’t been prescribed to you. 

However, the more you know about a medication you’re considering taking, the safer you will be. 

So, let’s talk about what the K 18 pill is, what it does, its side effects and risks, and the warning signs of addiction. 

If you’re worried about yourself or someone else you know that takes this medication, we’ll also talk about how you can get help for an addiction

Ready? 

What Is The K 18 Pill?

The first thing you need to know is that the k 18 pill is a 5mg oxycodone hydrochloride tablet, better known as oxycodone or oxy. 

Oxycodone is an opioid pain medication mostly intended for severe or long-term pain. It’s used for cancer patients, post-surgical pain, and occasionally for injuries like broken bones or torn soft tissue. 

Unfortunately, because these medications can also create a high or euphoric feeling, they’re also commonly used recreationally. 

Additionally, even when used properly, opioid medications can cause addiction and dependence. That’s a big problem because it can eventually lead to other forms of drug use and may force people dealing with an addiction to get drugs from other sources, which adds risk. 

There are many reasons to be concerned if you find k18 pills and don’t have an active prescription. However, it’s important to ensure you understand the side effects and risks before you try and handle the situation. 

learn about the possible risks and side effects of the k 18 pill

What Are The Side-Effects & Risks Of Taking The K 18 Pill?

Like most opioid pain medications, there are a fair number of side effects and risks that come with taking k 18 pills, whether you have a prescription for them or not. 

If you’re getting oxycodone in a prescription from your doctor, it’s a good idea to review the risks and side effects with them when you get the prescription. You can also talk to your pharmacist if you have any questions or concerns about the safe use of the medication or if you need to check to make sure k18 pills are safe to take with other medication. 

Even if the medication is safe for you to take and you take it as prescribed, you should still know about the possible risks and side effects of the k 18 pill. 

Here are some of the common side effects of oxycodone

  • Nausea
  • Increased or decreased appetite
  • Dry mouth
  • Headache
  • Stomach pain
  • Drowsiness 
  • Excessive sleep
  • Mood changes
  • Nausea (mild) 
  • Vomiting 
  • Confusion
  • Loss of coordination

In addition to those common side effects, there are also more serious side effects. If you have these side effects while taking k18 pills, you should stop immediately and contact a medical professional for help. 

  • Changes in resting heart rate
  • Irregular heartbeat
  • Extreme Agitation
  • More severe versions of any of the common side effects
  • Hives
  • Chest pain
  • Inability to get or maintain an erection
  • Itching
  • Rash
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Lightheadedness, especially when changing positions
  • Seizures
  • Unusual swelling (anywhere, but especially in your extremities, face, throat, or tongue)
  • Extreme drowsiness

Like other opioid medications, these side effects are in addition to some other risks of using the medication. Let’s talk about some of the other risks now: 

Depressed Breathing

One of the common side effects of opioid pain medications like the k18 pill is that taking these medications can slow your breathing and make it harder to breathe normally. 

Especially at high doses, people can stop breathing without realizing it, even if they haven’t technically overdosed on the medication. 

Some people may have slower and shallower breathing, even at low doses of these medications. 

It’s best not to be alone for the first few hours after taking k18 pills, especially the first time you use this medication and any time you increase the dose of the medication. 

Risk Of Addiction

Even when you’re taking k18 pills as prescribed by a doctor, there is a risk of developing an opioid addiction. If you use k18 pills recreationally, that risk increases. 

The longer you take opioid pain medications, the greater the risk of developing an addiction. Some people develop an addiction to opioid pain medications in as little as a single dose. 

However, when you’re taking opioid pain medications for pain and only take them as prescribed, your risk is much lower. 

Unfortunately, opioid addiction can also lead to other forms of addiction, especially after your prescription runs out or if you cannot find the opioid you usually take when you need it. It’s relatively common for opioid users to eventually start using heroin, fentanyl, and other dangerous and illegal medications. 

Risk Of Increasing Your Perception of Pain

Another big risk when it comes to using opioid pain medications, especially long-term ones, is that they can increase your sensitivity to pain over time. 

This is one of the most common reasons that people taking long-term opioid medications may increase their dose because they need more of the medication to relieve their perceived pain. 

Signs You May Be Struggling With An Addiction 

Because oxycodone is a highly addictive medication, there can be a lot of signs that you might have an addiction. 

It’s also important to remember that not everyone with an addiction will feel the same things and that you might have an addiction without some of the classic signs. These signs are good indicators, but you may be addicted without them or have some signs of addiction without actually having one – especially if you’re taking your medication as prescribed for pain. 

Here are some common signs that you might be dealing with addiction: 

  • You have to take more medication than prescribed
  • You’ve taken k18 pills without a prescription
  • You worry about being able to get more of your medication (more than average) 
  • You feel like you need to hide your use of k18 pills
  • You feel like you can’t relax without k18 pills
  • You feel like you’re more yourself when you’re medicated
  • You feel intense pressure to take k18 pills ahead of important events or high-pressure situations
  • You feel a lot of pressure to take k18 pills when you wouldn’t normally need them
  • You take k18 pills whether you’re in pain or not
  • You feel sick or anxious when you aren’t taking k18 pills
  • You’ve considered or have taken this medication at work (without a prescription to do so) 
  • You’ve considered or have bought this medication from the black market
  • You’ve gone to multiple doctors or multiple pharmacies to get your prescription
  • You’ve lied about how you were feeling to get more medication
  • You’ve considered buying other opioid medications to see if they give you the same high/relief
  • You’ve lied about your drug use to friends, coworkers, family members, or medical professionals
  • Your friends or family have talked to you about your use of the medication
  • You’ve considered or have stolen items to get money for your medication

There are many things on this list, so it’s good to look not for all the signs and symptoms of addiction. Instead, if more than 1-2 of these feelings or actions sound familiar, you might be dealing with an addiction. 

If you’re worried about developing an addiction while taking k18 pills, you should talk with your prescribing doctor about your concerns. 

Person feeling sick when not taking k18 pills

Need Help For An Addiction? Here Are Some Addiction Treatment Options

If you’re worried about an addiction to k18 pills, the good news is that you aren’t alone. Many people are dealing with addiction to the same medication, and many resources are available to help you and people like you overcome that addiction. 

It’s a good idea to start by talking with your primary care doctor about your medication use, concerns, and resources available to help you cope with addiction. They should be familiar with the local and accessible resources and may be able to make some referrals to help you get the support and addiction care you deserve. 

Another option is to look into the residential treatment centers in your area. Treatment centers provide full-service care and make it easier to concentrate on your recovery and build the coping skills and self-awareness you need to overcome your addiction and avoid future addictions simultaneously. 

If a residential treatment center for opioid addiction sounds like a good option, Heights Treatment is here to help you. Contact us to learn about our programs, the therapies we offer, and the intake process for new addiction patients.

 

Sources: 

  1. DailyMed – OXYCODONE HYDROCHLORIDE tablet. Accessed November 27, 2022. https://dailymed.nlm.nih.gov/dailymed/lookup.cfm?setid=aa7ac2bf-d9ed-445d-b394-4d3fe39780ca#:~:text=Oxycodone%20Hydrochloride%20Tablets%2C%20USP%3A%205,plain%20on%20the%20other%20side.
  2. Oxycodone: MedlinePlus Drug Information. Accessed November 27, 2022. https://medlineplus.gov/druginfo/meds/a682132.html
  3. Tobin SC. α2δ-1–NMDA Receptor Interactions Are Responsible for Increases in Pain Sensitivity Caused by Opioids. National Institute on Drug Abuse. Published December 12, 2019. Accessed November 27, 2022. https://nida.nih.gov/news-events/nida-notes/2019/12/a2d-1-nmda-receptor-interactions-are-responsible-increases-in-pain-sensitivity-caused-by-opioids

 

Amanda

Amanda is a prolific medical content writer specializing in eating disorders and addiction treatment. She graduated Magnum Cum Laude from Purdue University with a B.S. in Social Work. As a person in recovery from disordered eating, she is passionate about seeing people heal and transform. She writes for popular treatment centers such as Ocean Recovery, Ascendant NY, Infinite Recovery, Epiphany Wellness, New Waters Recovery and adolescent mental health treatment center BasePoint Academy. In her spare time she loves learning about health, nutrition, meditation, spiritual practices, and enjoys being the a mother of a beautiful daughter.

Last medically reviewed November 27, 2022